The Stand


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I ended up reading the unabridged version of this dystopian tale. I still loved the overall story though and have to give this book 5 stars because of the amount of world building and characterization that King ends up writing about. One thing that I had issue with on the unabridged version was the Trashcan Man chapters. It slowed down the pace for me and made me miss the other characters. I absolutely loved the ending of this book! Last of all, some of the characters in this book will be with me for years.

And I will always hate Harold Lauder with a raging passion. What a weasel! Fetch Kojak, fetch! View all 56 comments. May 23, Diane Wallace rated it really liked it. Haunting read! View all 11 comments. Other than a slow spot in the middle view spoiler [ Free Zone hide spoiler ] , it is perfectly paced and un-put-downable. That is where my problem with the Unabridged version lies — and I have seen other reviews complaining about the same thing; some even saying that the abridged version of The Stand is their favorite King book, and the Unabridged their least favorite.

There is just too much extra! I think the editors had it right when they cut down some of the extended scenes - they slow the pace considerably of what was a roller coaster ride of a book. There are extensive scenes at the beginning of the book and in the middle that felt like they would never end. The already slow part I mentioned above is now close to pages — longer than most books I read! The best paced part was the action packed final pages or so, and they were almost the same as in the abridged version.

Another thing that the extended parts caused was getting out of touch with the characters for a much longer time than before. It caused me to lose my connection with some of the minor characters because they are now overshadowed by the major characters. Also, most of the added parts related to the good guys, which made the story lines of the bad guys almost feel like an afterthought.

But, with the 5 star abridged version out there, it is no contest. While it is interesting to learn more about the characters, it throws the pacing off and makes it more of a chore and less of a joy to read. View all 15 comments. May 11, Will M. The place where you made your stand never mattered. Only that you were there So I finally finished this gigantic brick. This freakin' gigantic heavy brick, and all I can say is, this is probably the best freakin' brick ever made. With a heaping pages, this book managed to hurt both my wrists, and probably injured some of my fingers.

That's the price I had to pay to read this amazing novel. I never thought that I wouldn't finish this, fuck it I never even though The place where you made your stand never mattered. I never thought that I wouldn't finish this, fuck it I never even thought of putting this book down and read something else for the meantime. All I can say is, Stephen King managed to impress me again. Not that I doubted him though. Its a typical thing for King to serve us with multiple characters with different stories, and plunge them together at some point.

And as usual, some were amazing, and some were dreadfully boring unforgettable. This was also my experience while reading Needful Things, but his characters here are way better. I got an in depth description of each one, and I either loved or hated each one.

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That technique of King is truly remarkable. What goes best with an amazing plot? Well, freakin' amazing characters that's what. Ask me who my favorite is, and I'll probably end up describing most of them instead because I loved almost all of them. I remember complaining how long the novel is. I've read quite a few epics, but all of them were way shorter than this. When I finished though, and pondered upon what could've been excluded, none came to mind. I believe everything happened for a reason, or let me rephrase that, everything was written for a reason. You can't really take out something from the story, because then the plot holes would reappear.

The length of the novel is proportional to the enjoyment I experienced while reading this. Once again, the characters were amazing and fully developed. I actually cared for them, and I didn't want them to die. This novel focused on the battle between good and evil, in a lengthy epic like feeling. We have Mother Abagail on the good side, and Flagg as the devil.


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It's King's second time to introduce a devil-like character, and the character turned out just as amazing. Flagg truly depicted a strong devil. He's really a strong character that I would love to read more about in his other novels really hoping for a guest appearance. Harold is the one I hated the most while reading.

That pig really annoyed me. Everything he did was really annoying, and I wanted him to die at one point in the novel. Although I do have to point out that I hate him for a good reason. My hatred of him led to a better enjoyment of the novel. We all hate a character, and we want to see awful things done to them.

I'm more than satisfied with the characters King created. Lloyd and Nick were really amazing too. One is part of the dark team, and the other of the good team. I'm not gonna spoil who belongs where. All you need to know is that Nick's a kickass deaf-mute, and Lloyd's an annoying yet funny character. Tom's really cool too, despite being a retard. I didn't care for him that much in the beginning, but things started to change as I read along.

Stu and Fran's story would have to be my favorite of all the ones in the novel. Ever since the early parts of the novel, Fran's story already caught my interest, and it continued till the end. Larry Underwood's also really interesting. His pride overcoming him then more awful things happening really kept me interested in what would happen to him. I'm only going to mention those characters though, because who would want to read a spoiler and ruin their reading experience right? Those 3 are my favorites, but that doesn't mean that the others were boring.

I will repeat, almost all the characters are amazing. There will obviously be a few that would stand out, and those 3 are my choice. Wait, I forgot to mention another favorite, the freakin' dog Kojak!! I always love dogs in novels. Kojak didn't disappoint! The baby lives, and King kinda went Sci-Fi with all the science talk, and I loved it. He further expanded the world building, and in the end, he actually created a perfect world.

The baby problem in the latter part of the novel was really cool for me, and the solution was even cooler. I actually though either the baby or Fran would die, thankfully neither did. I actually thought he would, because King fucking wrote "and they never saw Stu Redman again". But that actually meant that the other three died. Even though Larry died, Stu's still my favorite so I'm not complaining.

His survival was also really interesting for me. Pneumonia and other sicknesses associated with his situation. Flawless writing from King. The back of the book states that " The survivors who remain are scared, bewildered, and in need of a leader. Two emerge - Mother Abagail , the benevolent year-old woman who urges them to build a community in Boulder, Colorado; and Randall Flagg the nefarious "Dark Man", who delights in chaos and violence.

Yes, both of them possess those amazing qualities, but I don't think it's right to say that both of them are the leaders of the novel. I get that people in the novel looked up to the both of then [in fear and in doubt] but neither of the two became my genuine favorite.

I really liked them both, yes, but that's that.

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Whoopi Goldberg, Alexander Skarsgard join Stephen King's The Stand

Randall's really outstanding with all the violence don't get me wrong, but Mother Abagail was presented as somewhat disgusting. Obviously opinionated, but hey, aren't all reviews opinionated? Maybe I should've said that I had one problem, because that's all I can think of as of right now. I had problems along the novel though, but all [except the one stated above] were resolved. Major problems like plot holes and all were resolved at the end of the novel, and that's awesome.

Mostly when I read a novel, the problems that I had while reading didn't get fixed. The Stand proved itself otherwise. The main problem would be that we tend to complain even if we're not yet done with the novel. The ending's really great. I'm not going to complain anymore because I really liked it. It gave me closure, and honestly, the ending's really witty. You'll have to read it yourself, but I really liked it. I'm not gonna put it in a spoiler tag anymore, because there's no reason to do so. Just read this amazing novel and see for yourself.

Once again, real witty of you King. This is why you're my favorite author. Flagg being the devil, I kinda figured he wouldn't end up dead. Why use a man made creation to kill a supernatural being right? I'm not considering this as a major problem of mine though, I just thought that King could've ended the novel in a different way. I can't think of a better ending though, so I also don't get this contradicting and useless spoiler tag.

I'm not saying don't read the other two, because they are both amazing in their own ways, and I'm also recommending them. The Stand is just King's novel that had the biggest impact on me, as of now. Such a shame to say that he's my favorite author yet I believe I've read less than ten books of his, and I've only read this now.

I'm planning to change that soon though, I can't wait to read more amazing novels written by King. A clear recommendation, and I can say that this is one of my best reads of View all 20 comments. Oct 21, Jessica rated it liked it Recommends it for: hypochondriacal jersey commuters. Shelves: happyendings. I read this book ages ago, but it's fresh in my mind every time I wind up stuck in traffic underneath the Hudson. It's about almost everyone in the world basically catching a bad case of the Plague and dropping dead. This premise doesn't seem very far-fetched, which could make it either more or less entertaining, depending on your temperment.

Here's my opinion about good old Stevie King: he's got a real problem with endings. He'll spin these long, terrific stories, but way too often they're all ba I read this book ages ago, but it's fresh in my mind every time I wind up stuck in traffic underneath the Hudson. He'll spin these long, terrific stories, but way too often they're all based in suspense, and he lures you to page or whatever, and leaves you high and dry.

Two years later, I'd finally recovered enough to brave It again, and the ending was so stupid that I sorely wished I'd saved myself months of clown-terror wakefulness by finishing it the first time. I mean, don't get me wrong, the guy can write. But he almost invariably writes himself into a corner, and his endings are a let-down. The great thing about The Stand, to me, is that King a. You can just see him crouched at his typewriter, chewing on something and grumbling, "Christ, what's my problem These goddamn endings I just need a deus ex machina.

The Stand's good stuff. It's not one of the scary ones well, it's scary in a different way than, say, The Shining , and in addition to having an ending I appreciate, it also gets pretty silly, but still: Recommended. Nov 26, Samadrita rated it it was amazing Shelves: post-apocalyptic , behemoth , dystopian-fiction , sci-fi-speculative , suspense-thrillers , politics , adoration , cherished , fantasy-mythology , adventure. One of the reasons why I would never club Stephen King together with any of the other best-selling writers of his generation Grisham, Archer, Patterson, Sheldon and so on is this :- None of them match King's calibre as a story-teller.

They don't even come close.


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  8. If somebody spins an intriguing tale, his characters get in the way of my enjoyment of it. If somebody excels at characterization, his plotting is rather unconvincing. If somebody plots a story well, then his writing turns out to be flat. And if you're unlucky enough, some of them mess everything up. But Stephen King possesses that rare talent of getting everything right - the story, the unraveling of the plot, the imagery, the underlying implications, the characters, the backdrop, the world-building, the writing - down to the very last detail.

    He can grasp your attention at the onset, reel you in slowly but surely, give you nerve-wracking moments of pure anxiety, make you visualize a scene exactly the way he must have imagined it, feel for the characters in his story as if they were people of flesh and blood you were familiar with and, at some point, render you completely incapable of discerning between reality and the make-believe world of his imagination. And you're caught in the same nightmare as the characters of his book are plunging deeper into with every passing moment.

    The Stand is one such Stephen King creation. Arguably known as his best written work yet, The Stand , I'm happy to inform readers, deserves every bit of the praise and adulation it continues to receive worldwide till this day. Now don't get me wrong. The book is nothing new when you glance at the blurb. It is the ever-fascinating and timeless tale of good triumphing over evil that you have come across enough times yet can never possibly get over.

    The Stand ( miniseries) - Wikipedia

    It is that same story, but with a distinct Stephen King-esque flavour. Add a dystopian, post-apocalyptic, anarchic world in the grip of an epidemic that claimed most human lives to the eternal conflict between good and evil, and the summation result will lead to The Stand. But it is so much more than this simple one-sentence summary. Every character, every plot device, every written scene has been constructed and put together so fastidiously in this book that at the end of it one feels that the reader is assigned with the task of collecting and preserving every piece of the gigantic puzzle to form this humbling, larger-than-life image the author had begotten.

    Horror, psychological ramifications of events, political intrigue, war, chaos in the absence of a centralized administration, a crumbling world order, basest of our human tendencies - King doesn't shy away from exploring the entire gamut of human actions and emotions in a world where nothing of the old establishments has survived. This man can write.

    There's no doubt about it. In terms of sheer volume, scale and narrative sweep, it is an epic. In a way it is The Ramayana, The Mahabharata, The Iliad and The Odyssey or a concoction of all the elements that transformed each one of these stories into epics the world will never cease to look upon with the utmost respect. It is the story that never becomes stale despite the number of years you insert between the time you read it first and read it for the umpteenth time in some other form.

    It is the story that transcends barriers of language, culture, religion and history and will always be told and retold in possible ways imaginable, for as long as humanity survives. It is the story of good, evil and everything in between. It is the story of love and hatred, loyalty and betrayal, sin and redemption, fate and co-incidence, rationality and the inexplicable. Of unalterable mistakes and innocence lost. Of the goodness of the human heart and the face of the Devil. I almost wished for it to never end. But then again one can always re-read to start the cycle of awesomeness all over again.

    View all 27 comments. Apr 29, Celeste rated it it was amazing Shelves: favorites , dystopian , horror , best-books-i-ve-ever-read , literary , monstrously-large. Full review now posted! Original review can be found at Booknest. Yes, you read that right.

    Six out of five stars. M-O-O-N, that spells phenomenal. Going into this book can be intimidating. It is also considered by many King fans to be his best work. Within this massive book mingle so many genres. The setting is an apocalyptic dystopia, but there is romance and adventure and humor and theology and satire and fantasy. If I could only re-read five books for the rest of my life, this would be one of those five because it gives its readers so much. Do you believe that happy crappy? Mother Abigail is a year-old black woman who has been appointed by God to lead the side of good.

    Though Flagg and Mother Abigail lead their respective sides, their followers are just as well-developed, of not more so. Honestly, there are too many amazing characters to list. But I think that the star of the show is Tom Cullen, a mentally handicapped man who accomplishes more than anyone would have believed possible. Tom made my heart squishy with his innocence and his belief in his friends. Every character King crafted within this story felt special and real and relatable, but Tom shone.

    Those who sided with Flagg were still sympathetic and relatable, while those who sided with Mother Abigail were still fallible and petty at times. There were no perfect protagonists here, and no flat cardboard antagonists who are easy to hate. These were all people, real people, and I connected with them all.


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    Besides the characters, my absolute favorite thing about this novel was its religious commentary. I knew going into this book that it was a post-apocalyptic war between good and evil, but I had no idea that it would impact my thinking this much. She had never been much of a thief; a minor pilferer from time to time at worst. The mother of sin was pride. Pride was the female side of Satan in the human race, the quiet egg of sin, always fertile. And this book was chock-full of it!

    The theological debates between characters and within their own thoughts was incredibly thought-provoking, and I would read this book again just for that. But there were so many more facets to this story. I highly recommend this book. Only that you were there … and still on your feet. View all 36 comments. Mar 16, myra rated it it was amazing Shelves: favorites. Un-[excuse my language] fucking - believable Uncle Steve did NOT disappoint.

    This man knows how to write a good book, over and over again. I bought The Stand a few years ago but i was never really interested in reading it. I was intimidated by the amount of pages it has. I hate myself for not picking it up earlier but it is what it is. It took me a few months but alright lmao.

    If you have never read a book by Stephen King before I highly recommend that you start with The Stand. View all 13 comments. This is a whole different kind of disturbing and an unforgettably frightening story but yet hopeful with such a complex and believable story of human behaviour. It's clear to us now why this is considered a masterpiece. How can we not say something about the length of this very long book and what an achievement we all felt after getting through it.

    Yeah us! We spent two weeks with this complex plot and intense and complicated characters and enjoyed the discussions it created with each other. Could we survive or rebuild? Hmm Stephen King maybe you could add another pages. This is an excellent book to choose for a group read and makes for great discussions. Would recommend! View all 58 comments. Were the pages worth it? Laws yes! I decided to start reading The Stand when I started my new course at university — one much harder than one the previous. The last two months have consisted of late nights, copious amounts of coffee and naps during physiology class.

    But The Stand has been my constant and loyal companion; one that I have used as a pillow in the aforementioned physiology class. Finishing the book felt like saying goodbye to a friend that had not once let me down. I had someone read most of it to me this time through headphones directly into my ears. My review from two years ago is below, and it is honest. I think I rushed the ending last time. Hell, I think I rushed a lot of the book last time. Like a million pages or something. It can feel overwhelming. My first time through I just wanted to finish. The book had beaten me to death, and I was ready to tap out, submit, cash in my chips, and call it a night.

    It was a fun ride getting reacquainted with some of these people, many of them I remembered vividly from before while some of them get new again. So I read all that stuff After a little break, I moved on, picked up where I left off, and continued my journey west with these crazy survivors. The middle felt a little bloated, a little over cooked, but it was good, man.

    I just stopped when I caught myself checking out, and I went back to the story again later. When I got to the last act The Stand! I really slowed down. I took the exact opposite approach I used the first time around, and it paid off. I completely missed it last time in my quest to speed to the end, but taking the time to really savor what was happening and letting it sink it made me enjoy this so much more this time.

    So, yes, read The Stand. Listen to it if you need to. View all 50 comments. Shelves: owned-physical-books. The Stand is totally not what I expected. I really thought this would be a super thrilling plot-driven with a lot of actions book due to the nature that the story revolves around a plague out 3. I really thought this would be a super thrilling plot-driven with a lot of actions book due to the nature that the story revolves around a plague outbreak. One of the two that stands out the most from this book—other than the gigantic size—in my opinion was the theological nature and the classic tale of a battle between good versus evil.

    That was an act of pure human fuckery. Once God or Satan is accepted as the first cause of everything which happens in the mortal world, nothing is left to chance The characters developments in this book were astounding to say the least and it was awesome to see how far these characters changed from where they began. It was a painful 70 pages chapter which in my opinion offer close to zero points to the story. Finally, with a book this HUGE, I really expected the ending to blow me away but the ending ended up being anti-climactic.

    Overall though, I think The Stand is still overall a great book. Thank you also to my good friend, Celeste, for giving me this book as a late birthday present!

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    View all 57 comments. I never get tired of reading this book. It's my absolute all time favorite reads. Every once in a while I have to go back and read it again and again I am a Stephen King fan and whilst I have read most of his books, The Stand has remained my all-time favorite. I read it when it was first published in and I was really happy when a longer I never get tired of reading this book.

    I read it when it was first published in and I was really happy when a longer and uncut version came out in and have since read it many times. It remains an incredible, riveting and unforgettable story. The following content was provided by the publisher, giving a brief synopsis of the story and information on the uncut version. A world in which good rides on the frail shoulders of the year-old Mother Abigail -- and the worst nightmares of evil are embodied in a man with a lethal smile and unspeakable powers: Randall Flagg, the dark man.

    In Stephen King published "The Stand, the novel that is now considered to be one of his finest works. But as it was first published, "The Stand was incomplete, since more than , words had been cut from the original manuscript. Now Stephen King's apocalyptic vision of a world blasted by plague and embroiled in an elemental struggle between good and evil has been restored to its entirety.

    It gives us new characters and endows familiar ones with new depths. It has a new beginning and a new ending. What emerges is a gripping work with the scope and moral complexity of a true epic. For hundreds of thousands of fans who read "The Stand in its original version and wanted more, this new edition is Stephen King's gift.

    And those who are reading "The Stand for the first time will discover a triumphant and eerily plausible work of the imagination that takes on the issues that will determine our survival. How quickly and easily greed, corruption and playing the Hand of God can bring humanity to its knees and even with the possibility of their total extinction.

    A suspenseful and emotional build-up to the final face-off of good versus evil. There is nothing random in anything. Complex and well developed characters that leap off the pages. It gives us a deeper understanding using the viewpoints of many of the characters — their back stories show the differences in the morality of humankind.

    The vivid descriptions make the plot and characters so real and believable. There are so many great characters in this story that some have left a lasting impression on me. They are all the things the civics books tell us the good citizen should be: partisans but never zealots, respecters of the facts which attend each situation but never benders of those facts, uncomfortable in positions of leadership but rarely unable to turn down a responsibility once it has been offered.

    They make the best leaders in a democracy because they are unlikely to fall in love with power. I became attached to him and when he finally finds his redemption in the stand against evil, it was totally devastating. You've always been one. It's like God left some part of you out when He built you inside of me. But I think there might be worms inside him making him smile. Tom Cullen — plays an important role in the story. Innocent and pure. He would be like a man in a darkened unfamiliar room who holds the plug of a lampcord in one hand and who goes crawling around on the floor, bumping into things and feeling with his free hand for the electrical socket.

    And if he found it — he didn't always — there would be a burst of illumination and he would see the room or the idea plain. I shall not want for nothing. He makes me lie down in the green pastures. He greases up my head with oil. He gives me kung-fu in the face of my enemies. I loved his attitude to life, humans and the world. And he had the most incredible lines in this book. Man may have been made in the image of God, but human society was made in the image of His opposite number, and is always trying to get back home.

    And that people who dream - or don't dream in a way they can often remember when they wake up - are mentally constipated in some way. Glen knows and accepts his fate and not afraid to laugh at the devil!!! He just makes a sign and lets people take it as they will. A healthy person might be apt to filter the divine message, to alter it with his or her own personality. In other words, a healthy person might make a shitty prophet.

    A face of true and dark evil. He roosts upside down with the bats. We discover the role that the main characters play in overcoming the Dark Man.

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    And wow…that was totally unexpected. Your will is still free. Do as you will. The epilogue totally blew my mind!!!!!!!!! Randall Flagg does not die in the atomic bomb blast?? What the hell…so some of the followers do Why not the evil scourge???? But then, I understood. Evil and good will always be the two forces that forever be facing each other…just another place, same light and dark with different faces. Bad things that happen are quickly forgotten pushed aside as memories past…and so the circle begins again. An eternal and never-ending battle where neither side wins or loses.

    The kerosene lamp flickered. Her eyes seemed very blue. View all 33 comments. None of us want to really see a Star in the East or a pillar of fire by night. We want peace and rationality and routine. It is over in a matter of weeks. Civilization grinds to a halt, then collapses, and then falls into chaos. A Mad Max world is born. A virus that kills The last thing any virus should do is kill the host. Death of the host leads to death of the virus. God had brought down a harsh judgment on the human race. This is man destroying himself. Since we are made in his image I do think sometimes what God, if he exists, likes least in us is what he likes least about himself.

    The whole theory of God is built on good and evil. If evil exists, then oddly God exists. The Vatican has been working relentlessly to prove for centuries that pure evil exists to justify the whole need for their continued existence. The proof might be rising out of the ashes of this virulent plague. These dreams are as vivid as they are confusing.

    There is a battle for their souls going on. They must choose. Do they go to Randall Flagg, or do they flock to Abagail Freemantle? You would think it would be an easy decision. Of course, we would join Abagail, the self-anointed prophet of God. Not to mention that she knows there has to be a reckoning.

    But are they evil? When people from the Boulder Free Zone mingle with those from the Dark Side, they find them to be normal people, just like the people they left back in Boulder. The biggest difference is that they are afraid, and fear, as we know, is the most insidious and easiest way to control people. Tap, tap, tap. The crow, looking in at him, seeming to grin. And it came to him with a dreamy, testicle-shriveling certainty that this was the dark man, his soul, his ka somehow projected into this rain-drenched, grinning crow that was looking in at him, checking up on him.

    Their power grows as people choose to believe in them. As long as civilization exists and people are reasonably content, a person like Flagg is never given an opportunity to thrive. We through our own discontent empower evil. This novel is one of the King epics. My favorite book, and the one that I feel will be considered his masterpiece, is IT , a book that I feel really brings together all of his best skills in building characters and shows off his gift for creating twisty, scary plots. IT is 2 on the Goodreads poll. Once you have been introduced to Pennywise try walking past a storm drain without giving it a wide berth.

    The Stand has a large cast, and most readers will have a favorite character. I liked several characters, actually, and wondered if I was going to find myself in a George R. Martin universe where identifying with a character was tantamount to self-inflicted grief. I was fortunate to stick with Stu Redman.

    He is a hick from Texas who continues to show hidden depths as circumstances shape and reveal his character. I always meant to read the suckers. Now it looks like I got the time. In the forward, Stephen King talks about the meeting he had with the publishing group about the size of The Stand. It was originally published at about pages, but then when they decided to reissue the uncut version, he was able to put back in about pages that he had been forced to excise. I think I did a fairly good job, for a writer who has been accused over and over again of having diarrhea of the word processor.

    They were able to show him the sales from his previous four books, the profit margin, and if he sold the same number of books of The Stand , how much slimmer the profit margin would be, because of the cost to produce the extra pages. So the cuts were not made for editorial reasons, but for common sense accounting reasons. King was very happy to have the orphaned material reunited with the rest of the book.

    The book does bog down at times for me. I think that is inevitable with a book this size. King is taking on some larger themes here and for the most part keeps all the plates spinning in the air. I have to admit, though, that I had to agree with lifestyle philosophy of the sociologist Glen Bateman. He seemed perfectly content—at least for the time being—to go for his walks with Kojak, paint his pictures, putter around his garden, and think about the sociological ramifications of nearly total decimation.

    It is truly amazing any of us can think. View all 28 comments. View all 25 comments. Dec 23, Evgeny rated it really liked it Shelves: horror. Humanity in general loves to play god trying to meddle in some very dangerous things. Military is not an exception as they are obsessed with creating more effective and devastating weapons. Considering the progress from a simple stone to an atomic bomb we became quite efficient at killing others en masse. Suppose we create a new virus which would make HIV look like a common flu.

    Great, now we can let it loose, wait and have all the enemy infrastructure intact with all the people gone. The proble Humanity in general loves to play god trying to meddle in some very dangerous things. The problem is virus does not care much about taking sides in a conflict.

    So such a virus was created paid for by US taxpayers and was accidentally released. The said taxpayers were practically wiped out with some rare exceptions that were immune to it. The end result: some occasional survivors have practically everything created by others just for taking. It seems to be practically a Utopia, but the people decided it would probably be boring so they split into two camps trying to wipe out each other.

    To be fair one of the group only wanted to eradicate the other in self-defense. The book is the story of how the disaster came to be and the story of these two groups. Before I begin rambling about the book I seriously need to get something of my chest. Other people call this phenomenon Typewriter Diarrhea, but I think my term is more general.

    I had a misfortune to read an unabridged edition of this. I lost count to the number of scenes that could be cut off without any impact on the remaining part. Just as an example: who cares about Fran's mother being a selfish bitch after her brother died? How did it affect the rest of the story? Do not get me wrong, King is a talented writer, but exercising some brevity in writing would improve the quality even further. As it stands now I did not go outside with a physical copy of the book being afraid I would be arrested for carrying as assault weapon.

    The book is clearly split in three parts: events leading to the catastrophe and its unfolding, survivors trying to cope, and two groups trying to exterminate each other. The first part was quite boring until the infection became widespread. I was not excited to read about day-to-day lives of the people that are about to die.

    To add an insult to the injury the people that were destined to survive were either jerks, or plain boring. Yes, I said it: nice people are boring ; this was one of the lessons I learned from the book. What would you rather read about: a guy helping an old lady cross the road, or a guy torching an oil repository?

    If you answer "the former" you are lying. As you can see nice people have no chance of survival whatsoever; we are left with jerks. In fact let me introduce Stephen King's apocalypse survival rule 1: the bigger jerk you are the better your chances. Here comes another problem: I did not care about jerks that much. This left me exactly one person to root for; that person had the least screen time. Take Fran I mentioned above: she came out as somewhat unbalanced woman falling into giggling hysterics at a slightest reason; not the one to care for. This boredom continued until the military began a serious cover-up campaign.

    Military cover-up methods are taken straight from the Mafia books: dead people tell no tales. This action brought much-needed well Here we finally get to the heroics and cowardliness of ordinary people. And then everybody died. Second part: the lonely survivors wonder around. I guess this part was OK, but I still have some things to say. Here King uses only black and white for characters with no gray shades: you are either with us, or against. I was also appalled by how quickly the self-appointed leaders decided their own lives are sacred and irreplaceable, but they are perfectly fine with throwing away lives of people around them.

    After all, they are good guys and as such Can Do No Wrong. Imagine how many wars we could prevent if only we would let the people that declare them to lead the first attack. We already established the good guys are boring. It turns out they are also stupid as several people were practically wearing signs saying, "I am a traitor" and it did not bother anybody. No wonder the bad side managed to get more intelligent people - who wants to spend their time with stupid?

    Last part: confrontation. Finally things start moving alone. Probably the fastest-moving part all the way until last two chapters which were loooooong and felt like a complete filler. Every single plot thread was resolved at this point, so why the delay? The very end came in opposition of everything that was said before. Not a single human being in the book bothered with creating new things. Supplies would run out, sooner or later. Does it mean another resource war is coming? By this time I read quite a few King's books and as a result I noticed some things I think worth mentioning.

    Practically all people in any King's story love to let their bladder go the moment they get even a little scared. No exception to this rule sorry one exception: tough as nails Roland the Gunslinger. The majority of bad guys often masturbate. Good guys never do. Reading King's stories never fails to make me hate the humanity.

    The hate goes away though - after a while and until I read his next work. Finally some amusing references: in the first part one of the cops works at 87th precinct and has a colleague named Steve Carella. Does it ring any bells? The amusing part is that this guy thinks Carella is completely dominated by his wife. I will be generous and call him being heavily inspired by The Stand instead. My final rating is 3. There are several reasons for this. I gave The Passage 4 stars and it would be completely unfair to rate the original less.

    I have several friends that love this book a lot and would lynch me without thinking twice if I rate it any lower. Finally, it is a good book despite all its weaknesses and problems. Have you noticed how big my review is? I am afraid I contacted the Word Diarrhea I mentioned above. Seems highly appropriate for this book. View all 42 comments. Laws yes, I finished this huge ass book! I put it off because of the sheer size of the book. I finally kicked my ass in gear and read this post-apocalyptic tale of good vs evil.

    I'm so glad I did! I went into this book not knowing much about the plot or characters. I did not watch the TV mini-series of The Stand which was produced back in I think it's better that way. I enjoyed reading about the trials and tribulations of the survivors trying to navigate in this new world.

    I loved this part of the book! And because of the death and destruction that occurs, Randall Flagg, the Dark Man comes back for the remaining survivors. Dun dun dun! I ended up reading the unabridged version of this dystopian tale. I still loved the overall story though and have to give this book 5 stars because of the amount of world building and characterization that King ends up writing about.

    One thing that I had issue with on the unabridged version was the Trashcan Man chapters. It slowed down the pace for me and made me miss the other characters. I absolutely loved the ending of this book! Last of all, some of the characters in this book will be with me for years. And I will always hate Harold Lauder with a raging passion.

    What a weasel! Fetch Kojak, fetch! View all 56 comments. May 23, Diane Wallace rated it really liked it. Haunting read! View all 11 comments. Other than a slow spot in the middle view spoiler [ Free Zone hide spoiler ] , it is perfectly paced and un-put-downable. That is where my problem with the Unabridged version lies — and I have seen other reviews complaining about the same thing; some even saying that the abridged version of The Stand is their favorite King book, and the Unabridged their least favorite.

    There is just too much extra! I think the editors had it right when they cut down some of the extended scenes - they slow the pace considerably of what was a roller coaster ride of a book. There are extensive scenes at the beginning of the book and in the middle that felt like they would never end.

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    The already slow part I mentioned above is now close to pages — longer than most books I read! The best paced part was the action packed final pages or so, and they were almost the same as in the abridged version. Another thing that the extended parts caused was getting out of touch with the characters for a much longer time than before. It caused me to lose my connection with some of the minor characters because they are now overshadowed by the major characters.

    Also, most of the added parts related to the good guys, which made the story lines of the bad guys almost feel like an afterthought. But, with the 5 star abridged version out there, it is no contest. While it is interesting to learn more about the characters, it throws the pacing off and makes it more of a chore and less of a joy to read.

    View all 15 comments. May 11, Will M. The place where you made your stand never mattered. Only that you were there So I finally finished this gigantic brick. Tag: Whoopi Goldberg. Tag: the stand. Tag: Saint Maud. Tag: A Tag: Jojo Rabbit. Tag: Toronto International Film Festival. More Whoopi Goldberg.

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